The much awaited AFRICA YOUTH IN TOURISM CONFERENCE roars in to life...... with most
of the Local and Foreign guests already in BULAWOYO, the organising team says its
all systems go and looks forward to Hosting this massive International conference for
youths in tourim from across Africa....

Kindly Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates.....  

We thank all our sponsors and service providers for your maximum cooperation. 
To all our delegates, We wish you all the best. 

....ALL ROADS LEAD TO .. BULAWAYO, ZITF GROUND 6-9 SEPTEMBER, 2017.

 

Zimbabwe Youth In Tourism

Vision

To promote youth pioneering in environment and tourism and sustainability tourism

Mission Statement

Zimbabwe Youth in Tourism is a non-profit organization of youth in tourism and environmental industry in Zimbabwe. Organizes and encourages all activities that can increase the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of nature and the awareness of tourism and environmental, problems among young people.

Our Core Values

Transparency, Accountability, Commitment, Efficiency, Impartiality

Our Patron, Honorable Auxillia Mnangagwa (MP)

 

Hon Auxillia Mnangagwa is the current house of assembly member for the Chirumhanzu Zibagwe Parliamentary Seat and deputy secretary for environment and tourism in the politiburo [1] She has been involved in a number of philanthropic activities. Among some of her philanthropic works, Auxilia was said to have been engaged with female prison officers and spouses of male prison officers in income generating projects. She has also been very instrumental in establishing women's banks in areas such as Zhombe Zibagwe and Chirimanzu among other centres [6] In 2013, she also launched a women's bank in Mvuma with the assistance of the Small and Medium Enterprises and Cooperative Development ministry. [6]

About Us Zimbabwe Youth in Tourism

It is a non-profit organization of more than 500 associations' youth in tourism and environmental industry in Zimbabwe. Organizes and encourages all activities that can increase the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of nature and the awareness of tourism and environmental, problems among young people. We also promote tourism and environmental ethics. It is dedicated to improving the quality of life of young people by facilitating their participation in the development and promoting their full involvement in all matters pertaining to the environment and sustainable development 

The A Y I T Concept

BACKGROUND
Tourism is one of the fastest growing and innovative industries. Tourism industry also contributes about 10% of the total Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the world. Sustainable tourism or alternative tourism has become part of sustainable development within the sector of tourism. The United Nations, African Union and SADC have supported the involvement of young people’s initiatives.
The African Union through the Africa Youth Charter has indeed ratified where all members have endorsed youth support and participation in sustainable development Goals (SDGs). Africa to this regard remains determined to achieve full industrialisation with the participation of young people. The provisions of the Africa Youth Charter strengthens Zimbabwe to become the first to host this important event.
In Zimbabwe, the National Youth Policy clearly defines the role of the youth in economic development hence Zimbabwe Youth in Tourism remains challenged and tasked to make and create  confidence  in the youths so that they partake opportunities as they come. Zimbabwe is set to host the first edition of the Africa Youth in Tourism Conference at the Zimbabwe International Trade fair in Bulawayo. While this is an international conference Zimbabweans especially the youths are going to advance the Brand Zimbabwe since more than 3000 delegates from Africa and abroad are expected.
This conference presents the Youth in Tourism with a platform to engage in dialogue that will enhance their business entrepreneurial skills and to find solutions challenges they are faced with. This conference will also discuss on environment and climate change especially how the two are key to tourism. After observing the trends of how environmental issues affect tourism in Africa. Youth in Tourism conference will have time to deliberate on input by the young people. It is critically important to discuss natural resource preservation, utilisation and protection for the achievements of sustainable development considering how Flora and Fauna are incentives to tourism.
In order to keep up with the dynamics in the industry it is important that the Youth in Tourism meet regularly to exchange and share experiences and learn from experts in the sector.
Africa Youth in Tourism greatly recognizes the contribution of young people in the tourism sector to create employment and alleviate poverty. It encourages youth to be involved in tourism development. 
Zimbabwe is set to host this year’s first Edition of the Africa Youth in Tourism from the 6-9 September 2017 at the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair Grounds in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. 
About 1000 delegates from across Africa are expected to attend this conference.

Objectives

  • To facilitate the mainstreaming of tourism into the education system across Africa.
  • To unpack opportunities in the tourism sector for youth development in fulfilling the Agenda 2063
  • To share lessons learnt on the Zimbabwe Visitors Exit Survey Report and encourage youth to explore the low hanging fruits in the tourism sector.
  • To use tourism as a vehicle for employment creation in the process contributing to poverty alleviation in Africa.
  • To foster the industry’s commitment to prevent sexual exploitation of children in Tourism.

Africa Youth in Tourism Agenda

  • The centre of the conference focuses on tourism aspects and a number of other programmes covering a wide variety of activities, which not only reflect the spirit of friendship but also peace and development. The conference provides a continental exposure to the youth for the expression and fulfillment of their talents, aspirations, career opportunities in the tourism industry.
  • The AYIT conference aims to propagate the concept of continental integration, spirit of communal harmony, brotherhood, courage and adventure amongst the youth by exhibiting their cultural prowess in a common platform.

Justification
The basis of this project is premised on the understanding and belief that real sustainability and competitiveness of tourism development in Africa can be achieved by;

  •  Involving the youth in all aspects of the nurturing of tourism entrepreneurship business in Africa.
  • Establishment of suitable tourism structures and platforms at national and continental level.
  • Targeted capacity building programs for youth in tourism across Africa.
  • Preparation of the youth for the global tourism stage. Industry through the.

Participants
Participants for the conference will be drawn from all Tourism Players in the African region. We are expecting 1000 delegates coming from;

  • African Accredited Embassies.
  • Non-Governmental Organisations
  • African Youth Organisations
  • Universities and Colleges
  • Youth Entrepreneurs.
  • Students studying tourism.
  • National Youth Councils in Africa.
  • Tourism Sponsors.
  • Empowerment Groups.
  • Children Rights Organisations
  • Private Sector
  • HIV and AIDS Organisations
  • Ministries responsible for Youth and Tourism issues in African Countries.
  • Tourism Boards and Authorities in Africa.
  • Cultural Groups and Organisations that fund or sponsor tourism.
  • Friends of African Countries.
  • Faith based organisations

 

STRUCTURE OF THE EVENT


The conference will be a three day event comprising of tourism-oriented discussions
Theme for Day 1 – Unpacking the Agenda 2063; Opportunities for youth in Tourism  
Theme for Day 2 – Entrepreneurship Development in the Tourism Sector; Role of the Youth 
Day 3 – Youth Empowerment through Domestic Tourism Initiatives; 
Concluding proceedings and Recommendations

EXPECTED OUTCOME

  • Youth aware of the critical components of the African Union Agenda 2063
  • Youth equipped to exploit the various opportunities in the tourism sector through Community Based Tourism Initiatives
  • Governments committing to assist youth in tourism entrepreneurship development to alleviate poverty in the region
  • Youth advocate for the Africa Youth Fund to set aside funds for the incubation of tourism related ideas by the youth.
  • Governments committing to set up youth desks in the Ministries responsible for Tourism across Africa to mainstream youth issues in the sector.

OTHER ISSUES TO BE MAINSTREAMED IN THE DISCUSSIONS 
Tourism And HIV/AIDS

  • The tourism industry is at particular risk from the pandemic due to the mobility of the work force and the general public, the presence of sex tourism and the countries’ heavy reliance upon tourism revenue.
  • High chances of spreading the virus back and forth as tourists engage in sexual activities with sex workers, hotel staff, youth and children.
  • The tourism sector, as the largest and fastest growing industry in many countries, is a likely target for HIV/AIDS intervention.
  • Therefore, youth in tourism need to come up with programs to discourage the spread of the pandemic.

Tourism And Children

  • Youth in Tourism to come up with programmes to curb child physical and sexual exploitation by foreign tourists.
  • To protect children from being used as baggage carriers and sex workers.

Exhibition

  • Corporates, Government Ministries, Parastatals, Youth Associations, Individuals are invited to exhibit for a small fee.
  • For exhibition space please contact the above contacts while space is still there.

CONCLUSION
The success of the tourism industry depends upon the involvement and active participation of young people in its sustainable development. The youth should institute mechanisms for adequate monitoring and evaluation to take into account the dynamics of the changing environment.

YOUR SUPPORT AND PARTICIPATION WILL BE GREATLY APPRECIATED!!!

 

 

ZIMBABWE YOUTH IN TOURISM.

AYIT - Organising Team

RAINBOW TOWERS HOTEL

No 1 Pennefather Avenue,

Samora Macheal Avenue West Harare 
Zimbabwe

Tel: +263 4 757 090-3 / +263 4 754 507-8
Cell: +263 777 396 854 / +263 171 396 854

Whatsapp: +263 772 616 625

Emailinfo@ayitzim.org or zimenvironment5@gmail.com

Facebook: @ayitzim2017

Twitter@ayitzim2017

YouTube: ayitzim2017

 

THE ICON OF AFRICA AND GLOBAL HERO.

 

THE CITY OF BULAWAYO, AYIT 2017 HOST CITY.

The Joshua Nkomo Stature In Bulawayo.

 

Bulawayo City Hall

Bulawayo City Hall

 

Bulawayo Thermal Power Station

Bulawayo Thermal Power Station

 

AYIT CONFERENCE BANNER

 

 

 

 

SPEAKERS

 

 

The much awaited AFRICA YOUTH IN TOURISM CONFERENCE roars in to life...... with most
of the Local and Foreign guests already in BULAWOYO, the organising team says its
all systems go and looks forward to Hosting this massive International conference for
youths in tourim from across Africa....

Kindly Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates.....  

We thank all our sponsors and service providers for your maximum cooperation. 
To all our delegates, We wish you all the best. 

....ALL ROADS LEAD TO .. BULAWAYO, ZITF GROUND 6-9 SEPTEMBER, 2017.

 

Guest of Honor and Speakers

This Event will be graced by the presence of estimed Guest of Honour, HONOURABLE MINISTER CDE DR. O.M MPOFU, High profile speakers from all circles including but not limited to, Business, Religion, Sports, Gender and Culture and will thus prepare our youth and equip them to better their livelihoods through participation in various progrmmes at this conference. We will Post the information as it comes.

 

STRUCTURE OF THE EVENT


The conference will be a three day event comprising of tourism-oriented discussions. Theme for Day 1 – Unpacking the Agenda 2063; Opportunities for youth in Tourism. Theme for Day 2 – Entrepreneurship Development in the Tourism Sector; Role of the Youth. Day 3 – Youth Empowerment through Domestic Tourism Initiatives; 
Concluding proceedings and Recommendations

 

EXPECTED OUTCOME

  • Youth aware of the critical components of the African Union Agenda 2063
  • Youth equipped to exploit the various opportunities in the tourism sector through Community Based Tourism Initiatives Governments committing to assist youth in tourism entrepreneurship development to alleviate poverty in the region Youth advocate for the Africa Youth Fund to set aside funds for the incubation of tourism related ideas by the youth. Governments committing to set up youth desks in the Ministries responsible for Tourism across Africa to mainstream youth issues in the sector.

 

OTHER ISSUES TO BE MAINSTREAMED IN THE DISCUSSIONS 
Tourism And HIV/AIDS

  • The tourism industry is at particular risk from the pandemic due to the mobility of the work force and the general public, the presence of sex tourism and the countries’ heavy reliance upon tourism revenue. High chances of spreading the virus back and forth as tourists engage in sexual activities with sex workers, hotel staff, youth and children. The tourism sector, as the largest and fastest growing industry in many countries, is a likely target for HIV/AIDS intervention. Therefore, youth in tourism need to come up with programs to discourage the spread of the pandemic.

 

Tourism And Children

  • Youth in Tourism to come up with programmes to curb child physical and sexual exploitation by foreign tourists.
  • To protect children from being used as baggage carriers and sex workers.

 

 

THE VARIOUS TYPES OF TOURISM

AGRO Tourism

ECO Tourism

Ecotourism is now defined as "responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment, sustains the well-being of the local people, and involves interpretation and education" (TIES, 2015).  Education is meant to be inclusive of both staff and guests. Principles of Ecotourism. Ecotourism is about uniting conservation, communities, and sustainable travel. This means that those who implement, participate in and market ecotourism activities should adopt the following ecotourism principles: Minimize physical, social, behavioral, and psychological impacts. Build environmental and cultural awareness and respect.
  • Provide positive experiences for both visitors and hosts. Provide direct financial benefits for conservation.
  • Generate financial benefits for both local people and private industry. Deliver memorable interpretative experiences to visitors that help raise sensitivity to host countries' political, environmental, and social climates.
  • Design, construct and operate low-impact facilities. Recognize the rights and spiritual beliefs of the Indigenous People in your community and work in partnership with them to create empowerment.
Click Here to read the full articles announcing the revisions.

 

 

MINING Tourism

This is a travel topic that deals with all man-made structures under and above ground whose primary purpose is or was the extraction of natural resources as well as their remains, associated culture and small scale resource gathering such as gold panning from rivers and creeks.

Understand[edit]

Inside Falun copper mine
Humans have dug more or less elaborate holes in the ground in order to extract resources since time immemorial. The oldest things archaeologists interpret as mines were found in modern day Egypt and were used to extract flint-stone some 30 000 years ago. Since then both the need for resources and the technology with which to extract them have experienced tremendous development. Modern-day open pit mines have transformed whole landscapes and once they are done removing all the desirable resources, they often leave man made lakes and ponds that can become a source of economic activity and tourism in themselves. While some active mines can be visited, most mines are closed to the general public with only a small visitor center if anything. However, some former mines have been converted into tourist attractions and you can learn a lot about the history of the region or of mining in general by taking a guided tour.
Some towns owe their existence or at least their current size to mining, be it Kiruna and Falun in Sweden, Norilsk in Russia or continued human presence on Svalbard. On the other hand, many former mining communities have been deserted once resources run out, and bustling cities can become ghost towns overnight. In some cases a mine itself is the reason for the abandonment of settlements, either to make room for open-pit mining or due to environmental damage through mining.
Mining has also added its own rich character to the cultural heritage of many regions, from the vocal imagery of the powerful folk ballad to the literary works recording old miners' myths.
Mining and the associated culture - especially in the context of coal and steel - have also influenced things as seemingly unrelated or trivial as the names or nicknames of sports teams. Many areas - especially in high-income countries - that used to depend on mining have since entered a decline, and despite efforts to diversify the economy, many of those areas have become "rust belts". That said, people are often immensely proud of the mining heritage of their region and some even continue to live those traditions after having moved elsewhere for a job. Open pit versus shafts and tunnels[edit] Modern mining often involves open pits created by huge machines. Older mines dug by hand often involve deep shafts and adits (long narrow corridors) underground. For instance the silver mines at Kongsberg has the deepest point 1,000 m below the surface (several hundred meters below sea level). The intensive 1600s mining at Falun eventually resulted in a collapse of the underground sections, leaving a 100-m deep and 1-km wide crater. A major problem in (almost) all mining operations is water. In open pit mines groundwater has to be lowered, sometimes hundreds of meters, leading to ground movements that are still not entirely understood and that have in the past damaged houses and other structures several km away from the mine. Once the mining is concluded the rising groundwater also results in ground movements, which may further endanger property. In underground mines, water has to be pumped out and of course this water has to go somewhere. In some cases it is simply pumped into abandoned shafts, but elsewhere ponds have been created just from surplus mine water. Salt mining[edit] Salt was a valuable commodity for most of history and scarce in almost all inland regions. The very word "salary" is derived from the Latin word for salt. While sea salt played a role in some areas, it was then as it is now vastly overshadowed by mined salt. While the people in the North Frisian Islands burned the ground beneath their feet to access the salt contained in the peat, other regions had access to vast underground salt domes, which gave rise to fabulous wealth and to names often relating to former or current salt production, such as Bad Reichenhall with "hall" being a frequent component in city names in Central Europe related to salt mining.

 

 

MICE Tourism

Meetingsincentivesconferences and exhibitions, or Meetings, Incentives, Conferences, and Events (MICE) is a type of tourism in which large groups, usually planned well in advance, are brought together for a particular purpose. Recently, there has been an industry trend towards using the term 'meetings industry' to avoid confusion from the acronym.[1] Other industry educators are recommending the use of "events industry" to be an umbrella term for the vast scope of the meeting and events profession.
Most components of MICE are well understood, perhaps with the exception of incentives. Incentive tourism is usually undertaken as a type of employee reward by a company or institution for targets met or exceeded, or a job well done. Unlike the other types of MICE tourism, incentive tourism is usually conducted purely for entertainment, rather than professional or education purposes.[2] MICE events are usually centered on a theme or topic and are aimed at a professional, school, academic or trade organization or other special interest group.
Convention bureaux[edit]
Example: Penang Convention & Exhibition Bureau (PCEB) in Penang Island, Malaysia.
MICE event locations are normally bid on by specialized convention bureaux in particular countries and cities and established for the purpose of bidding on MICE activities. This process of marketing and bidding is normally conducted well in advance of the event, often several years, as securing major events can benefit the local economy of the host city or country. Convention bureaus may offer financial subsidies to attract MICE events to their city.[citation needed] Today it is usually used to boost hotel revenue.
MICE tourism is known for its extensive planning and demanding clientele.[3]

 

 

 

COMMUNITY Tourism

A community by definition implies individuals with some kind of collective responsibility, and the ability to make decisions by representative bodies.  Community based tourism is tourism in which local residents (often rural, poor and economically marginalised) invite tourists to visit their communities with the provision of overnight accommodation.  The residents earn income as land managers, entrepreneurs, service and produce providers, and employees. At least part of the tourist income is set aside for projects which provide benefits to the community as a whole.  Community based tourism enables the tourist to discover local habitats and wildlife, and celebrates and respects traditional cultures, rituals and wisdom. The community will be aware of the commercial and social value placed on their natural and cultural heritage through tourism, and this will foster community based conservation of these resources. 

The tourist accommodation and facilities will be of sufficient standard for Western visitors, albeit those expecting simple rural accommodation. The community will be required to have continuous access to a phone (which might be required for medical assistance) and daily access to email (which will be required by operators to confirm bookings). 

 

SUN SAND & SEA Tourism

Sea, sun, sand and sustainability. Shaping tomorrow's tourism in Jamaica and Senegal
Tourism is the world's biggest industry, accounting for 10 percent of global wealth production. The top 15 countries in terms of tourism earnings hold a 60 percent share of the market and are all developed countries. Even so, the 'alternative tourism' (including nature-based or 'eco-tourism') market is the fastest growing sector in the business. The abundant natural assets of many developing countries should put them at the forefront of this trend. But how to avoid destroying those same assets in the process? Can tourism be made sustainable? A report for the UN Department of Policy Co-ordination and Sustainable Development in association with the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) pinpoints valuable lessons from Jamaica and Senegal. It shows that 'quality' tourism can display keen awareness of environmental and social necessities. But it also warns that astute monitoring and independent verification will be necessary to maintain standards.

 

CULTURAL & HERITAGE Tourism

  1. 1. What is Cultural and Heritage Tourism? • Focus on historical, artistic, scientific, and lifestyle/heritage • Experience cultural environments, visual and performing arts, lifestyle, values, traditions and events • Festivals, banquets, music, theater, village and rural life, gastronomy, visiting/tasting local products, village buildings and “atmosphere”, historic and religious monuments and ruins, famous people
  2. 2. Cultural tourism vCultural tourism (or culture tourism) is the subset of tourism concerned with a country or region's culture, specifically the lifestyle of the people in those geographical areas, the history of those people, their art, architecture, religion(s), and other elements that helped shape their way of life. vCultural tourism includes tourism in urban areas, particularly historic or large cities and their cultural facilities such as museums and theatres. vIt can also include tourism in rural areas showcasing the traditions of indigenous cultural communities (i.e. festivals, rituals), and their values and lifestyle. vIt is generally agreed that cultural tourists spend substantially more than standard tourists do. vThis form of tourism is also becoming generally more popular throughout the world, and a recent OECD report has highlighted the role that cultural tourism can play in regional development in different world regions. vCultural tourism has been defined as 'the movement of persons to cultural attractions away from their normal place of residence, with the intention to gather new information and experiences to satisfy their cultural needs'. These cultural needs can include the solidification of one's own cultural identity, by observing the exotic "other".
  3. 3. Forms of Cultural Heritage
  4. 4. TPOLOGIES OF HERITAGE & CULTURAL TOURISM PRODUCTS Secret NO TANGIBLE INTANGIBLE 1. Historical Buildings and Places Oral History and Traditions 2. Declared Heritage Resources (Sites & Objects) Indigenous Knowledge Systems 3. Cultural Objects and Collections Rituals and Cultural Performances 4. Artifacts and Crafts Performances and Creative Arts 5. Fine Art Skills and Techniques 6. Cultural Landscapes (including natural environment) Belief Systems 7. Archeological evidence Cultural Festivals 8. Geological evidence Popular Memory 9. Paleontological remains 10. Sacred and spiritual sites
  5. 5. Benefits to the Community • Economic vitality • Leverage human capital • Restore, revitalize a geographical area • Expand business and tax revenue • Create an innovative habitat – to attract knowledge- based employees • Create a sense of pride and belonging by residents
  6. 6. Resource Based Cultural Tourism : a) archaeological sites , monuments, routes, and museums b) architecture (ruins, famous buildings, whole towns) c) art, sculpture, crafts, galleries, festivals, events d) music and dance (classical, folk, contemporary) e) drama (theatre, films, dramatists) f) language and literature study, tours, events g) religious festivals, pilgrimages h) complete (folk or primitive) cultures and sub- cultures. i) Theme Parks j) Cultural-historic events
  7. 7. The heritage tourism products
  8. 8. 1. Religious tourism • Religious tourism is one of the most prevalent forms of heritage tourism in the developing world today and is among the earliest precursors of modern day tourism. • Pilgrimage takes many forms, but central among these is the desire of religious for blessings, become closer to God, offer more sincere prayers, become healed, and receive forgiveness for sins. • Much pilgrimage requires self-humbling and penitence, which can be effected more readily in some cases by the afflictions associated with traveling along a prescribed pilgrim route (Shair and Karan 1979). • In India, for example, domestic and international travel by Hindus for religious purposes is an important part of the tourism economy, and the Kumba Mela religious pilgrimage is the largest tourist gathering in the world (Singh 2006) • Pilgrimage should be considered a form of heritage tourism from at least three perspectives. v First, the sites visited are heritage places, including churches, mosques, temples, synagogues, shrines, sacred mountains, and caves/ grottos. v Second, pilgrimage routes have become heritage resources based on their historical role in the practice of pilgrimage. v Finally, the forms of worship and the religious rites undertaken at venerated places have become part of an intangible heritage, or a set of socio-cultural practices that demonstrate inwardly and outwardly the weightiness of the journey.
  9. 9. 2. Diaspora tourism • Diaspora tourism is a form of ethnic and personal heritage tourism, wherein people from various backgrounds travel to their homelands in search of their roots, to celebrate religious or ethnic festivals, to visit distant or near relatives, or to learn something about themselves (Coles and Timothy 2004). • Significant numbers of people from various diasporas travel to their homelands each year in fulfillment of predictions that heritage tourism is as much related to the individual and social identities of the tourists themselves as it is about the historic places they visit. • African Americans and British, particularly those who have descended from the slave trade, are especially ardent travelers to Africa. For these tourists, the journey is particularly profound but complicated, often wreaking havoc on their emotions and identities as black Americans or British. • Many of them seek forgiveness, healing, and closure; others seek revenge and are stirred to anger against the white European and American perpetrators of slavery (Teyeand Timothy 2004; Timothy and Teye 2004)
  10. 10. 3. Living culture • Living culture is an important part of heritage tourism . Agricultural landscapes, agrarian lifestyles, arts and handicrafts, villages, languages, musical traditions, spiritual and religious practices, and other elements of the cultural landscape provide much of the appeal for tourism. • Rice paddies and farming techniques, traditional architecture and building materials, intricate clothing and cloth, exotic-sounding music, vibrant ceremonies, and unusual fragrances and flavors are part of the appeal. • An interesting and vital part of living culture is culinary heritage, cuisine, and floodways. The foods, preparatory methods, food-associated rites and rituals.

 

 

VFR Tourism

 

"Visiting Friends and Relatives" (VFR tourism / VFR travel) is a substantial form of travel worldwide. Scholarly interest into VFR travel developed in the mid 1990s after Jackson’s (1990) [1] seminal article suggested that this type of tourism was much larger than official estimates suggested.[2] Most official data collections differentiate travel as being for either leisure, business, or VFR purposes. In many destinations, VFR is the largest or second-largest form of travel by size. Definitions have been traditionally lacking due to the complexities involved in understanding VFR travel. VFR travellers can state a VFR purpose of visit but that does not necessarily mean that they are staying with those friends / relatives. Similarly, they may be accommodated by friends / relatives although have a different purpose of visit.[3]
One definition put forward has been "VFR travel is a form of travel involving a visit whereby either (or both) the purpose of the trip or the type of accommodation involves visiting friends and / or relatives" [4] This has subsequently been developed into a VFR definitional model to describe it visually.[5]
VFR expenditures tend to be quite broad; spread widely throughout the community rather than confined to the narrow tourism sector (McKercher, 1995).[6] In some expenditure categories, VFR travellers have been shown to outspend non-VFR travellers (Seaton & Palmer, 1997;[7] Morrison, Verginis et al., 2000) [8]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AGENDA

 

 

The much awaited AFRICA YOUTH IN TOURISM CONFERENCE roars in to life...... with most
of the Local and Foreign guests already in BULAWOYO, the organising team says its
all systems go and looks forward to Hosting this massive International conference for
youths in tourim from across Africa....

Kindly Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates.....  

We thank all our sponsors and service providers for your maximum cooperation. 
To all our delegates, We wish you all the best. 

....ALL ROADS LEAD TO .. BULAWAYO, ZITF GROUND 6-9 SEPTEMBER, 2017.

 

STRUCTURE OF THE EVENT


The conference will be a three day event comprising of tourism-oriented discussions. Theme for Day 1 – Unpacking the Agenda 2063; Opportunities for youth in Tourism Theme for Day 2 – Entrepreneurship Development in the Tourism Sector; Role of the Youth 
Day 3 – Youth Empowerment through Domestic Tourism Initiatives; Concluding proceedings and Recommendations

EXPECTED OUTCOME

  • Youth aware of the critical components of the African Union Agenda 2063
  • Youth equipped to exploit the various opportunities in the tourism sector through Community Based Tourism Initiatives
  • Governments committing to assist youth in tourism entrepreneurship development to alleviate poverty in the region
  • Youth advocate for the Africa Youth Fund to set aside funds for the incubation of tourism related ideas by the youth.
  • Governments committing to set up youth desks in the Ministries responsible for Tourism across Africa to mainstream youth issues in the sector.

 

OTHER ISSUES TO BE MAINSTREAMED IN THE DISCUSSIONS 
Tourism And HIV/AIDS

  • The tourism industry is at particular risk from the pandemic due to the mobility of the work force and the general public, the presence of sex tourism and the countries’ heavy reliance upon tourism revenue.
  • High chances of spreading the virus back and forth as tourists engage in sexual activities with sex workers, hotel staff, youth and children.
  • The tourism sector, as the largest and fastest growing industry in many countries, is a likely target for HIV/AIDS intervention.
  • Therefore, youth in tourism need to come up with programs to discourage the spread of the pandemic.

 

Tourism And Children

  • Youth in Tourism to come up with programmes to curb child physical and sexual exploitation by foreign tourists.
  • To protect children from being used as baggage carriers and sex workers.

 

Exhibition

  • Corporates, Government Ministries, Parastatals, Youth Associations, Individuals are invited to exhibit for a small fee.
  • For exhibition space please contact the above contacts while space is still there.

 

CONCLUSION


The success of the tourism industry depends upon the involvement and active participation of young people in its sustainable development. The youth should institute mechanisms for adequate monitoring and evaluation to take into account the dynamics of the changing environment.
 
 

REGISTRATION

 

 

The much awaited AFRICA YOUTH IN TOURISM CONFERENCE roars in to life...... with most
of the Local and Foreign guests already in BULAWOYO, the organising team says its
all systems go and looks forward to Hosting this massive International conference for
youths in tourim from across Africa....

Kindly Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for live updates.....  

We thank all our sponsors and service providers for your maximum cooperation. 
To all our delegates, We wish you all the best. 

....ALL ROADS LEAD TO .. BULAWAYO, ZITF GROUND 6-9 SEPTEMBER, 2017.

 

Registration now in progress and Accrediation Team is onsite at the ZITF grounds

 

For any Enquiries you can also send mail to: (Just click the E-mail address link below) It will direct you to a page where you will be able to send through the email:

Email to:

zimenvironment5@gmail.com

 

Most important and required details are:

on E-Mail Subject: State-AYIT REGISTRATION

Your Full Names, Your Contact Number, Age, Gender, Your Country, Date Of Arrival, Mode of Transport, Flight Number, Or Bus Name, Your Organisation , and any Other Information You may want us to know.

 

 

 

Our Banking Details:

FBC BANK SOUTHERTON BRANCH–

Zimbabwe Youth In Tourism

ACC No: 1032724560156

 

 

Media Coverage

 

Events Such as Press Conferences, Cleanup campaings, Fundraising activities, past, current and future are covered by various media houses, some of whow have become our offical partners, like ZBC and Zimpapers. Kindly Follow links to some of the stories published: Story By Tendai Mbirimi: http://www.herald.co.zw/zim-set-to-host-africa-youth-in-tourism-conference/  The Information and Publicity Committee is working on the following Publicity Roll out plan. Clean Up Campaigns Clean up campaigns are meant to clean up cities – tourism blooms in clean environments. Clean Up Campaign – Harare 
Date: 29 July 2017   Clean Cup Campaign  - Bulawayo 
Date: End of August – date TBA   Tree Planting Venue: Epworth
Date: Early August – Date TBA – possibly second week of August. Brief Outline: Trees are part of the ecosystem in which tourism is situated. While we are going to plant trees in the outskirts of Harare – the message remains that we need beautiful fauna and flora to promote tourism. We shall brand this event with AYIT 2017 banners, branded t/shirts and handout pamphlets on AYIT 2017.   Donation to Orphans Orphanage: Mathew Rusike
Date of event: August Orphans are part of the future. They are the Youths-in-Need. As the Youths In Tourism it is important to ensure that other youths get a future and the little that we can afford to do will benefit the future. Our donation is in food and clothing. 
  1. Harare City Netball Team  - Harare Queens will be joining us and co-funding the event. They will donate goods whose value is TBA
  2. A seed producing company to be confirmed
  3. PaRoots Restaurant
  4. Fleximart Supermarkets
  5. And others TBC
  1. Quiz Competition
12 Universities and colleges are lined up and ready to start the AYIT 2017 Tertiary Tourism Quiz Show. I am working on getting the tourism show on television. The students are ready to go.  This should culminate in the winner being crowned during AYIT 2017. 
  1. Press Conference
Press Conferences for the Patron or assigned speaker to ensure the nation gets an update on AYIT 2017 preparations. To date we have done two press conferences, and the following are lined up: Third Press Conference
Purpose:  Ambassadorial Endorsement – where Ambassadors come in 
Date: 24 July 2017
Venue: Harare at a local hotel   Fourth Press Conference  - Bulawayo Stakeholders Endorsement 
Date: Mid August date TBC 
Here the Patron will be accompanied by stakeholders in Tourism and related industry in Bulawayo. The aim is to have Bulawayo and Matabeleland endorsing the event and conforming participation.   Fifth Press Conference  - All set  - Bulawayo 
Date: TBC
This will be the last press conference confirming that all is now set for the AYIT 2017. The press conference will announce participants and the programme.   Studio Interviews In between the above press conference, both ZBC TV and Radio as well as ZiFM and Star FM will run a series of interviews to keep the nation informed and promote the event.  
  1. Adverts
A series of adverts should be run in the media, especially on the media partners ZBC and Zimpapers.  More information on this to follow.  
  1. March and Road show
The last event of our Publicity Campaign will be held in Bulawayo where a HUGE roadshow will be held. This will encompass corporates funding the event, stakeholders, exhibitors and the AYIT 2017 Family Wwe are currently finalizing this Mother of all Road shows which will bring Bulawayo to a standstill as it will have drum majorettes, police band, university students and others as indicated above. This should come a day before the event roars into life.   KEEP FOLLOWING................

 

 

THE VENUE

ZITF Grounds, Situated in the City of Kings, Zimbabwe's second commercial hub, Bulawayo.

 

 

 

It is hard to have any discussion about the City of Bulawayo without acknowledging its deep seated roots to the history of the Ndebele people. The City is located on a site selected by King Lobengula, for his personal Kraal and became the capital in 1870 when he emerged as successor to King Mzilikazi, his father and founder of the Ndebele state. Initially named "Gibixhegu" the capital was later named "ko Bulawayo" and the king lived there until 1881. The name originally called ko Bulawayo is generally interpreted as the “place of slaughter or the place of killing”. Government House now stands on the actual site. During his reign national issues were discussed at "Entenjaneni" or "Enyokeni" which was the "Indaba tree”. Bulawayo was occupied by the Pioneer Column on the 4th November 1893 and was declared a Town by Dr Jameson of the 1st June 1894. Bulawayo then became a City under Proclamation 41 on the 4th November 1943. Each year in November the City of Bulawayo celebrates the declaration of the City during the Month of November.
To recognize the role of the past on the history of the City of Bulawayo, the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe together with the Ministry of Home Affairs requested for the construction of Bulawayo in 1992. After consultations with the chiefs and the Khumalo clan, approval was granted.

 

 

Victoria Falls also known as
Victoria Falls also known as "Mosi oa-Tunya" ("the smoke that thunders") is positioned almost exactly half way along the mighty Zambezi River's 2700 km journey from it's source to the sea.
Here the river plunges headlong into a 100m vertical chasm spanning the full one-and-a-half kilometre width of the river.Creating the biggest curtain of falling water in the world and also one of the seven natural wonders of the world. 
The power of the falls is awesome with the highest ever flow recorded in 1958 (read more about this flood and the mythology surrounding it) when it reached more than 700 000 cubic meters of water a minute. The water in the gorges rose 18 metres (60 feet) above its normal flood level.
This constant pounding by the currents of the mighty Zambezi has, over the millennium, cut through the rock faults and fissures and carved out not one but eight successive precipices (and now the ninth has begun).
When our early ancestors inhabited this area some 1.5 million years ago, they would have seen a different Victoria falls to he one we see today.
Being one of the greatest physical spectacles in Africa it stands to reason that it has attracted so much much interest from us humans over time and therefore the area is steeped in history and mystery.
In November 1855, Dr David Livingstone was transported in a canoe by the local Makalolo people to the very edge of these falls.
The sensitive Scotsman was so overwhelmed by his first sight of these spectacular falls, that he momentarily abandoned his scientific observations and recorded.
"It has never been seen before by European eyes, but scenes so wonderful must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight".
Loyally the good missionary, whose heart lies buried in Africa, named this great wonder of the world after Victoria, his British queen.

We have gone into much more depth about these facts on Victoria Falls and many others in the links below:
Facts on Victoria Falls

Height, width, volume... Victoria Falls is approximately 1700m wide, and varies in height from 80-108 meters. It’s one and a half times wider than Niagara Falls and is twice the height making it the biggest curtain of water in the world.
Around mid-April is when peak flood waters occur. Roughly 625 million litres of water flow over the edge per minute. This huge volume of water produces a spray that rises up to 1650 feet into the air.

 

MATOPOS
The hills contain gigantic caves (notably Bambata, Nswatugi, and Silozwane) with Khoekhoe paintings, and there are Stone and Iron Age archaeological sites. The name may have originated from matombe or madombe, meaning “the rocks,” or from matobo, “bald heads.” Matopo Hills in the Matobo National Park, Zimbabwe.

 

STAY INFORMED

Tel: +263 4 757 090-3 / +263 4 754 507-8
Cell: +263 777 396 854 / +263 171 396 854 +263 772 616 625 Emailinfo@ayitzim.org or zimenvironment5@gmail.com Facebook Page: @ayitzim2017 Twitter@ayitzim2017